pseudoscorpion needs more than a pseudo identification

Recently I received a request to identify a bug and a fuzzy picture. Normally I’m pretty good at this but I think this time I may need some help. I also have added the reasons as to why I have come up with my answer but I’d love to hear from some other experts in the field. So below is the comment and the picture. If you have any ideas and would like to comment please feel free to help me out.

Vicky says on July 27th, 2009
Hi,
My sister is in Quebec in a secluded area basically living in a dorm and she saw a bug she’d never seen before sticking it’s pincers out of a crack in the wall. Her first thought was bed bugs, but the pincers are much longer than the images we’ve found online. Is there any other bug it could be? I have a fuzzy image of it I could email to you. Thank you in advance for your help!

Vicky

It took awhile of looking but the ‘pincers’ are what lead me to believe this is a pseudo scorpion. They are somewhat curved like one and although the pic is fuzzy it seems they might be segmented. I checked and indeed Canada does have them and although they are rare inside it does happen.

Some info on the pseudoscorpion

The pseudoscorpion is not really a scorpion at all, it is in the arachnid (spider) family. They are very small, only about 3 mm or so. There are around 2000 different species found worldwide but only 6 in Alberta. Quebec seems a little far but who knows. Of those one in particular is most commonly found indoors. Totally harmless this beneficial insect eats mites and other insects smaller than itself.

Well that’s my guess but I’m only one set of eyes and perhaps you have another idea or something in Vicky’s comment spurred a whole other train of thought. Please let us know what you’re thinking and add any information you have.

Thanks.

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Jerry Schappert is a certified pest control operator and Associate Certified Entomologist with over two and a half decades of experience from birds to termites and everything in between. He started as a route technician and worked his way up to commercial/national accounts representative. Always learning in his craft he is familiar with rural pest services and big city control techniques. Jerry has owned and operated a successful pest control company since 1993 in Ocala,Florida. While his knowledge and practical application has benefitted his community Jerry wanted to impart his wisdom on a broader scale to help many more. Pestcemetery.com was born from that idea in 2007 and has been well received. It is the goal of this site to inform you with his keen insights and safely guide you through your pest control treatment needs.
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  • Kimberly Erickson

    I have these “pseudoscorpions” at my house too! I have been trying to identify them since I bought this house 3 years ago. I find them extremely disturbing. I live in central Minnesota, near Alexandria. I grew up in this area, and have never seen anything like this before. I mostly see them in the winter time, but have seen them in the summer inside and outside. Is there something I can do to get rid of them?

  • At this time of year It might be good to do a simple pest control treatment using liquids and a little dusting. http://pestcemetery.com/kill-bugs-dusts/

    This should be enough for you to get by till spring. I’ve rarely seen where these creatures invade a home in any great numbers.

    Thanks for reading

  • Greenartificialturfgrass

    Hi Dear
    that s wind scorpion is Chelifer cancroids , this pseudoscorpions are not dangerious animal. so don t worry.

  • Thanks Green,

    Sage advice!

  • ArachnoGBH

    Wait, wait, wait. You’re suggesting spraying for pseudoscorpions? That’s preposterous!  They are amazing arachnids that couldn’t harm a human if they tried! I look for them all the time and can never find them. You should consider yourself lucky to be in such close proximity to them! Besides, as predators, they may eat any ‘true pests’ that may be in the dorm.

  • ArachnoGBH

    Wait, wait, wait. You’re suggesting spraying for pseudoscorpions? That’s preposterous!  They are amazing arachnids that couldn’t harm a human if they tried! I look for them all the time and can never find them. You should consider yourself lucky to be in such close proximity to them! Besides, as predators, they may eat any ‘true pests’ that may be in the dorm.

  • ArachnoGBH

    That’s not a wind scorpion. Wind scorpions are the order Solifugae and have huge chelicerae, but no pincers that stick out front. Pseudoscorpions, order Pseudoscorpiones, may be referred to as ‘pseudoscorpions’ or ‘false scorpions’ but ‘wind scorpion’ is inaccurate.

  • ArachnoGBH

    That’s not a wind scorpion. Wind scorpions are the order Solifugae and have huge chelicerae, but no pincers that stick out front. Pseudoscorpions, order Pseudoscorpiones, may be referred to as ‘pseudoscorpions’ or ‘false scorpions’ but ‘wind scorpion’ is inaccurate.

  • Thanks for your insight Arachno,

    Even “beneficial” insects need to be treated at times when the thresh hold of health or tolerance is crossed. For some folks that line is drawn out further than for others. I’m sure even you would grab a can of Raid if you had a nest of bees just outside your window and they were getting in or a completely harmless roach that you found in a closet.  

    What your tolerance level is may not be what another’s is. So while you are right that it is preposterous to apply pest control for a tiny hapless insect– try telling that to the young lady who has not been able to sleep at night worried about an ominous looking insect with pincers. you are in this case only right- for you.

    Thanks for reading

  • Dpabbott

    I second that !!!!!!

    I also have them in my house,  only seen a few but still……..eeeeeew !!!     New Brunsick Canada

  • Canada is ripe with these things! Maybe it’s time to break out the spray Dpabbott