Pincer bugs aka Earwigs

picture 6 300x232 Pincer bugs aka EarwigsOver the years as a bug man you get pretty good at figuring out what bug a customer is trying to describe just from a few tell tale words. Of course there is the other side to this where they say. “It’s black and has wings and I think it has teeth,what is it?” Then maybe even the best of us need a little more information.

The earwig is one that is almost always described as having ‘pinchers’. Technically it’s ‘pincers’ but nobody really calls them that. Some will say they are on the front and others will tell you they are the size of a pair of pliers but pinchers none the less is always a key word that leads me to an answer for my client.

The pinchers on an Earwig are almost completely harmless, I say almost because they can arch their backs and give you a wee tiny prick. So on the scale of harmless they are about a 0.001.

Actually the pinchers are used in their little world for defense, capturing and holding the prey that picture 7 Pincer bugs aka Earwigsthey catch so they can eat them and it’s also how you can tell the boys from the girls. For the most part Earwigs eat just a little of everything including plant leaves, other insects, dog food, garbage or organic material. Usually the leaf damage they do is very little and you wouldn’t notice much if any of your pets food missing if it weren’t for the occasional Earwig who gets trapped in the slippery bowl.

Preferring to feed at night this insect would rather be left alone but their high need for moisture can bring them into our homes from time to time. There are occasions where the ‘nuisance’ becomes a full fledged invasion and that is about the only time you really need to consider some type of control method.

The $64,000 dollar question / How to get rid of Earwigs?

picture 5 300x213 Pincer bugs aka EarwigsI’m often asked this question and I see it on forums and comment sections of web sites all the time. The biggest reasons that Earwigs are entering your home are for food and for moisture. Eliminate those two and you’ll be left with only the few who just wander in by chance. Now you might be saying, “I don’t live in a moist house, why would they come in my home?” The answer is simply that they don’t know your home is not some Mecca for a nice moist bed of leafy green plants they can eat. They just know that outside it may be to dry and they’ve got to go on the move to find what they need. Or sometimes the sprinkler head may be pointed towards your home and the excess moisture in your mulch allows them to build up in large numbers and as they wander they find a crack or slip in under the door thinking they’ll find much of the same environment inside. Regardless the common denominator is the moisture and they are always in search of it. Food is the other reason and there is not much you can do about plant leaves or organic material. You can however try to limit leaving pet food just outside the door or inside next to the sliders. They will find it every time and once they have their fill it’s off to your bedroom to hopefully catch the Tonight show with Conan O’Brien.(He’s quite good) There are other helpful hints in this category that you can read up on that will help a great deal. Most often a simple crack and crevice treatment and a little baiting outside will be all that’s required from your pest control professional and the problem should subside. One other home remedy that I hear works quite well is to dampen some newspapers and roll it up. Place the paper just outside where you thinkpicture 8 Pincer bugs aka Earwigs you have Earwigs and they will crawl into the papers seeking moisture and die. I’m not sure if it’s the ink that kills them or the story about the economy on page two but according to some old timers I know, they say it works.

Whenever I see an Earwig in my home I almost always try to scoop him (or her) up and put them back outside. The benefits of having them far out weigh the need for getting out my 300 feet of hose and blasting the exterior of my house with 30 gallons of insecticide. I used to pick them up with my fingers but then I got pinched a few times so now I use a dust pan or piece of paper. I guess you might say I have a low pain tolerance.

Get Free Email Updates!

Signup now and receive an email once I publish new content.

I will never give away, trade or sell your email address. You can unsubscribe at any time.

About The Bug Doctor

Jerry Schappert is a certified pest control operator and Associate Certified Entomologist with over two and a half decades of experience from birds to termites and everything in between. He started as a route technician and worked his way up to commercial/national accounts representative. Always learning in his craft he is familiar with rural pest services and big city control techniques. Jerry has owned and operated a successful pest control company since 1993 in Ocala,Florida. While his knowledge and practical application has benefitted his community Jerry wanted to impart his wisdom on a broader scale to help many more. Pestcemetery.com was born from that idea in 2007 and has been well received. It is the goal of this site to inform you with his keen insights and safely guide you through your pest control treatment needs.
This entry was posted in Earwigs and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.
  • Julie

    This article has been very helpful in identifing that what I have are earwigs. But we have them BAD. I’ve seen them in the past, but NEVER like this. There are dozens in my potted plants on my deck. I don’t even want to “dead head” my flowers because there are so many of them. My husband went to re-hang some of our solar lights and there was about 3 dozen of them living inside of one of the lights (it was stored under our porch while our deck was being rebuilt)

    I hate bugs and between ants, japanese beetles and earwigs I don’t even want to go out and enjoy my deck. Everything has been really thick this year and I don’t know if stuff was stirred up from the construction of my deck, if stuff came in with the wood or what…..I live in Minnesota. Please tell me what to do!

  • Julie

    This article has been very helpful in identifing that what I have are earwigs. But we have them BAD. I’ve seen them in the past, but NEVER like this. There are dozens in my potted plants on my deck. I don’t even want to “dead head” my flowers because there are so many of them. My husband went to re-hang some of our solar lights and there was about 3 dozen of them living inside of one of the lights (it was stored under our porch while our deck was being rebuilt)

    I hate bugs and between ants, japanese beetles and earwigs I don’t even want to go out and enjoy my deck. Everything has been really thick this year and I don’t know if stuff was stirred up from the construction of my deck, if stuff came in with the wood or what…..I live in Minnesota. Please tell me what to do!

  • The Bug Doctor

    Hi Julie,
    You do have em pretty bad. I doubt very much that they came in with the wood but I’m sure they took advantage of the free and cool hiding spot under the deck. I just went through a major landscaping myself and we stored things a little longer than we wanted. Just today I found so many earwigs and other bugs living under all of my piles of rock etc. The mere act of getting the storage off the ground will help somewhat but it will also make them move to different spots if they can find em.
    For the underside of the deck I would put a liberal amount of Niban bait. You can use a gloved hand and just throw it. (this is assuming it’s high enough to get some under) I think you may have to get Niban at a DIY store but maybe your Lowes or Home Depot has it. If you can’t find that I’m sure the store will have something else you can use bait wise. Make sure to read the label and that earwigs are on the list. Bait can also be used in the potted plants but an insecticide granule might work better, just sprinkle on the dirt and water in. If you have a sprayer you might want to treat around your windows and door frames as well to try and keep them out of the home. I rely heavily on baits but limiting where they can hide and moisture control is also key. Check out my article http://pestcemetery.com/3-easy-steps-rid-earwigs/ for more details on 3 easy steps you can take to keep your earwigs to a low roar.

    Thanks for reading
    The Bug Doctor

    Ps. We’ll take Brett Favre back if you’re using him– It’s to weird to root for my Pack when he’s playing for your team. :)

  • The Bug Doctor

    Hi Julie,
    You do have em pretty bad. I doubt very much that they came in with the wood but I’m sure they took advantage of the free and cool hiding spot under the deck. I just went through a major landscaping myself and we stored things a little longer than we wanted. Just today I found so many earwigs and other bugs living under all of my piles of rock etc. The mere act of getting the storage off the ground will help somewhat but it will also make them move to different spots if they can find em.
    For the underside of the deck I would put a liberal amount of Niban bait. You can use a gloved hand and just throw it. (this is assuming it’s high enough to get some under) I think you may have to get Niban at a DIY store but maybe your Lowes or Home Depot has it. If you can’t find that I’m sure the store will have something else you can use bait wise. Make sure to read the label and that earwigs are on the list. Bait can also be used in the potted plants but an insecticide granule might work better, just sprinkle on the dirt and water in. If you have a sprayer you might want to treat around your windows and door frames as well to try and keep them out of the home. I rely heavily on baits but limiting where they can hide and moisture control is also key. Check out my article http://pestcemetery.com/3-easy-steps-rid-earwigs/ for more details on 3 easy steps you can take to keep your earwigs to a low roar.

    Thanks for reading
    The Bug Doctor

    Ps. We’ll take Brett Favre back if you’re using him– It’s to weird to root for my Pack when he’s playing for your team. :)

  • Ze’ev Kalin

    This summer, for the first time, my home has been inundated with earwigs. When I get dressed in the morning I shake out everything because I found an earwig hiding in a pocket. If I pick something up it’s a good bet there’ll be an earwig under it. I opened up a bag of pita and there were THREE earwigs in the bag (it was a type I hadn’t tried before and I was really looking forward to tasting it). I wondered if they got in there here or in the bakery. Today, when I lifted my shaving brush out of the cup with the shaving soap there was an earwig and three specks about the size and color of grains of pepper which definitely hadn’t been there when last I looked. I’m guessing that was earwig scat and I’m wondering if this bugs poop could be infected with something that might make me sick. I didn’t eat the pita, but what if I hadn’t seen that first earwig…. I must have read thirty on line articles and, if they say anything at all, they just say earwigs are harmless. I’ve read that people can get some nasty illness’s from cockroach feces so I’m hoping you can help clarify this for me.

    Thanks,

    Ze’ev

  • Ze’ev Kalin

    This summer, for the first time, my home has been inundated with earwigs. When I get dressed in the morning I shake out everything because I found an earwig hiding in a pocket. If I pick something up it’s a good bet there’ll be an earwig under it. I opened up a bag of pita and there were THREE earwigs in the bag (it was a type I hadn’t tried before and I was really looking forward to tasting it). I wondered if they got in there here or in the bakery. Today, when I lifted my shaving brush out of the cup with the shaving soap there was an earwig and three specks about the size and color of grains of pepper which definitely hadn’t been there when last I looked. I’m guessing that was earwig scat and I’m wondering if this bugs poop could be infected with something that might make me sick. I didn’t eat the pita, but what if I hadn’t seen that first earwig…. I must have read thirty on line articles and, if they say anything at all, they just say earwigs are harmless. I’ve read that people can get some nasty illness’s from cockroach feces so I’m hoping you can help clarify this for me.

    Thanks,

    Ze’ev

  • The Bug Doctor

    Ze’ev

    Even in our foods that we normally think of as bug free there is an ‘allowable’ amount of bug eh hem, particles. People in white coats have done tests and determined that bug parts and yes probably some feces under a certain amount is considered harmless to humans. It could be that they just figured there’s no way to stop it from happening so they had to come up with something to ease the consumers mind.
    You bring up an excellent point and one I hadn’t considered. Rather than spout off what I don’t know please allow me to dive into this subject a bit and I’ll contact you through your e-mail when I have some sort of answer. (good or bad)

    Thanks for your insightful question and please look at my article http://pestcemetery.com/top-3-reasons-you-have-earwigs-the-7-links-to-get-rid-of-them/ This seems to be helping people out quite a bit with treatment and exclusion tips.

    Thanks for reading
    The Bug Doctor

  • The Bug Doctor

    Ze’ev

    Even in our foods that we normally think of as bug free there is an ‘allowable’ amount of bug eh hem, particles. People in white coats have done tests and determined that bug parts and yes probably some feces under a certain amount is considered harmless to humans. It could be that they just figured there’s no way to stop it from happening so they had to come up with something to ease the consumers mind.
    You bring up an excellent point and one I hadn’t considered. Rather than spout off what I don’t know please allow me to dive into this subject a bit and I’ll contact you through your e-mail when I have some sort of answer. (good or bad)

    Thanks for your insightful question and please look at my article http://pestcemetery.com/top-3-reasons-you-have-earwigs-the-7-links-to-get-rid-of-them/ This seems to be helping people out quite a bit with treatment and exclusion tips.

    Thanks for reading
    The Bug Doctor

  • Ian

    Hay doc
    So I woke up this morning with a bloody nose and after I plugged it I blew it and an ear wig flew out of my ear so is there anything I should do like go see a doctor or am I fine???

  • Ian

    Hay doc
    So I woke up this morning with a bloody nose and after I plugged it I blew it and an ear wig flew out of my ear so is there anything I should do like go see a doctor or am I fine???

  • The Bug Doctor

    Sounds like you had a bad night Ian– You might want to get that checked out:)

  • The Bug Doctor

    Sounds like you had a bad night Ian– You might want to get that checked out:)

  • cheyanne

    thanks for the information because we didn’t now what it was

  • cheyanne

    thanks for the information because we didn’t now what it was

  • The Bug Doctor

    Glad I could help, not knowing and seeing pincers like that would be a little un-nerving.

    Thanks so much for reading my blog
    The Bug Doctor

  • The Bug Doctor

    Glad I could help, not knowing and seeing pincers like that would be a little un-nerving.

    Thanks so much for reading my blog
    The Bug Doctor

  • Dae

    Thanks for the great information that helped me identify this terrifying bug. It’s definitely good to know that they aren’t heralds of doom!!

    But still…I’ve got the bugs bad! I’m living in Denver, CO in an apartment on the third floor (top floor) of my complex. During the winter I had noticed a couple of the bugs here and there. No problem, they were easy to deal with. However for the past couple of months they’ve seemed to grow in population.

    I have seen a couple crawling along the baseboards all around the apartment (carpeted expect the kitchen and bathroom), they are usually alone. I have not seen any inside my cat’s water or food bowl, or in the large bag of food in the pantry. They seem to hang out in the bathroom underneath a spare towel that I keep on the opposite side of the bathroom from the bathtub. When I come home from work in the evening I can lift the towel and there are 4 or 5 of them latched to the bottom.

    My concern is that a trap isn’t going to go much. I’ve inspected my bathroom time and time again, and I can’t figure out where they are getting in from. The bathroom is the furthest room away from both the front door and the balcony, could they be coming in from a vent? Why are they attracted to the dry towel in the bathroom? Surely it’s cool and moist (I shower in the morning), but the bath mats that I step on as I exit the shower are bound to hold more moisture.

    I have found them in my clothes several times now, so I too have adopted a habit of shaking everything before putting it on. What can I do? I have dealt with approximately 3 dozen of them in the past two weeks, and I’m not really one for sharing! At least not with creepy crawlers!!

  • Dae

    Thanks for the great information that helped me identify this terrifying bug. It’s definitely good to know that they aren’t heralds of doom!!

    But still…I’ve got the bugs bad! I’m living in Denver, CO in an apartment on the third floor (top floor) of my complex. During the winter I had noticed a couple of the bugs here and there. No problem, they were easy to deal with. However for the past couple of months they’ve seemed to grow in population.

    I have seen a couple crawling along the baseboards all around the apartment (carpeted expect the kitchen and bathroom), they are usually alone. I have not seen any inside my cat’s water or food bowl, or in the large bag of food in the pantry. They seem to hang out in the bathroom underneath a spare towel that I keep on the opposite side of the bathroom from the bathtub. When I come home from work in the evening I can lift the towel and there are 4 or 5 of them latched to the bottom.

    My concern is that a trap isn’t going to go much. I’ve inspected my bathroom time and time again, and I can’t figure out where they are getting in from. The bathroom is the furthest room away from both the front door and the balcony, could they be coming in from a vent? Why are they attracted to the dry towel in the bathroom? Surely it’s cool and moist (I shower in the morning), but the bath mats that I step on as I exit the shower are bound to hold more moisture.

    I have found them in my clothes several times now, so I too have adopted a habit of shaking everything before putting it on. What can I do? I have dealt with approximately 3 dozen of them in the past two weeks, and I’m not really one for sharing! At least not with creepy crawlers!!

  • The Bug Doctor

    Hey there Dae,
    Although earwigs aren’t as skillful as other insects climbing is not a problem apparently-man the 3rd floor? Bummer. My guess is their coming up from the plumbing. If your complex has extermination service see if you can get them to ‘dust’ the voids especially in the bathroom. After that I’d caulk up all the cracks I could find and seal up around the pipes where they enter the wall. ie; under the sink. Now I know you’ve seen them in other places but earwigs are scavengers and wanderers so start with the bathroom first and do more sealing if you still see them it those areas. Also traps might work well for you if you keep the kitty out and put the towels up for the day. I think void dusting will be your best bet and here is a link on how you can do it if the complex doesn’t have anyone. http://pestcemetery.com/kill-bugs-dusts/

    If it gets to much call an exterminator. I met two guys from Colorado at A.C.E. (associate certified entomologist) testing in Orlando–http://www.mugabugpestcontrol.com/ They seemed knowledgeable and hey they both passed the test. Tell em Jerry from pestcemetery.com told you to call. :)

    Thanks for reading
    The Bug Doctor

  • The Bug Doctor

    Hey there Dae,
    Although earwigs aren’t as skillful as other insects climbing is not a problem apparently-man the 3rd floor? Bummer. My guess is their coming up from the plumbing. If your complex has extermination service see if you can get them to ‘dust’ the voids especially in the bathroom. After that I’d caulk up all the cracks I could find and seal up around the pipes where they enter the wall. ie; under the sink. Now I know you’ve seen them in other places but earwigs are scavengers and wanderers so start with the bathroom first and do more sealing if you still see them it those areas. Also traps might work well for you if you keep the kitty out and put the towels up for the day. I think void dusting will be your best bet and here is a link on how you can do it if the complex doesn’t have anyone. http://pestcemetery.com/kill-bugs-dusts/

    If it gets to much call an exterminator. I met two guys from Colorado at A.C.E. (associate certified entomologist) testing in Orlando–http://www.mugabugpestcontrol.com/ They seemed knowledgeable and hey they both passed the test. Tell em Jerry from pestcemetery.com told you to call. :)

    Thanks for reading
    The Bug Doctor

  • Guest

    THANK YOU! We just found one of these in the bathroom and it looks a lot scarier than it is (I guess). My husband smooshed it with some TP and sent it down the toilet. At least we know what it is now.

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    Things can be a bit scary when you don’t know what you’re dealing with- You were wise to check it out and get the facts. Kudos!

    Thanks for reading
    The Bug Doctor

  • Recycle

    An earwig has been trapped in my coffee maker for at least six weeks. It is in the part of the maker that registers the amount of water added to the reservoir. It moves up the column when I add water, then moves back down the column after the coffee is made. I’m surprise it has lived this long. About 4 weeks ago I quickly poured vinegar into the reservoir, hoping the earwig could not outrun it and would die. It didn’t work. I don’t have the heart to pour boiling water in. Any idea how long they can go without food?

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    Wow! That’s a first. You earwig (if he can keep it up) might last till next spring as typically earwigs live for about a year after hatching and have sometimes two generations per year. I can’t imagine what it could get to eat but they are scavengers for the most part and there must be a little something inside that tube. All bugs that I know of can live longer without food than water but six weeks seems like a record. If you can’t get the tube of to get it out try this; Empty and unplug your maker and turn it upside down for the night. This may get the earwig to go to the bottom and he might just find his way out or when you see him there you can quickly turn it over and catch him with your vinegar trick. If all else fails we should talk about what to do– I’ll meet you at the local ‘coffee house’ :)
    Hey if you can get a pic for me and send it via my “Ask The Bug Doctor” tab at the top of my site. You can upload pics there.

    Thanks for reading
    The Bug Doctor

  • Recycle

    I cannot believe this! I hadn’t been on the computer for several days so I just read your response. I grabbed my camera to take a picture before trying the upside down vinegar trick you mentioned. The earwig is gone! My husband made coffee the last two mornings so the last time I can confirm the earwig was still trapped was Friday afternoon. I guess it finally found an escape route. I just wish I’d thought to capture it on camera.

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    That’s the world of bugs for ya! I’ve learned to never say never and rarely put anything beyond the realm of possibilities. lol–You should have your husband make the coffee more often, sounds like he has a knack for it :)
    Thanks for reading and make sure to check back for anything pest control wise you may need

    The Bug Doctor

  • Guest

    Every night for the past couple of weeks I have found earwigs outside on my cement stairs and on the cement leading up to the stairs. They seem to be sleeping or just hanging out in the cracks and crevices of the cement. Why all of a sudden are they everywhere? I don’t see them much during the day. What can I do to get rid of them?

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    Earwigs rest during the day usually in a cool and damp place–that crack must do the trick. You can use insecticide dust in it for longer term control or even put soap and water down it and watch them come running out. Check the area for places like this such as planters, welcome mats etc. and my guess is you’ll find more.

    Thanks for reading

    The Bug Doctor

  • Melly

    I’m so glad to have found your blog; thank you so much. I have to tell you, I HATE earwigs with a purple passion. The little devils get into the weirdest places. Once I found a petrified one between the pages of a favorite cookbook, and both pages were stained. Later on, I was keeping my sugar in a container with a snap lid. After I used it for a while, I noticed that the sugar inside had hardened. When the container was empty and I went to wash it, I noticed that it was NOT sugar; it was a petrified earwig. I guess the little jerk died happy. Yuck. I have oil and vinegar containers, the kind that have long spouts. I use craft corks to plug the tops after I cut a little hole in the bottom to fit over the spout. The vinegar container has been empty for weeks; I had cleaned it in the dishwasher and kept the cork on it. Two afternoons ago, I saw a full sized male ugly little disgusting earwig in the bottom of it, with the cork cover in place, a little water in the bottom (did it barf?), and several spots of earwig poop. How did it get in there?! It is now sitting on my windowsill, where I watch it ALL THE TIME, fearful that the little monster might get out. Now I’m feeling sorry for the little creep, wondering if I should feed it something, but I’m also thinking of the sight I was greeted with when I went outside a few nights ago to put out trash. I turned around to come back into the house, and there were scores of the little devils on the wall, just sitting there, waiting to pounce on me. So now I’m thinking to pour either alcohol into the bottle (it kills almost any bug if it’s small enough) or boiling water. But if I do that, I might not be able to sleep tonight. Years ago when I first moved into this house, it was crickets, crickets everywhere, coming down the chimney flue and all over the living room. The only way to get them was to use the shop vacuum I had; they didn’t have a chance. Then it was sow bugs that were getting into my stews and soups (I have no idea how they tasted, and don’t want to know). Then, for years it was ants making trails through the house, and crawling across my eyebrows during the night. Now this. I have to go; this is making me feel buggy and itchy. Sigh…..

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    Boy Melly,
    Your home is creating quite the history for itself! It amazes me how these little critters can get into so many tight spaces. Have you tried some of the control treatments I’ve written about? I think I have 8 or so articles on just earwigs so I’m sure there will be something in there that will help you. To answer your question about the liquid-I’m not aware of earwigs being able to ‘barf’. It may have been some moisture in the jar already that it picked up while crawling around which makes some sense as to why it went in there–they actively seek moisture out.

    Hope you stopped feeling itchy ;)

    The Bug Doctor

  • Pingback: Spider Babies Hatch Despite Dead Mother

  • Diane

    We have not lived in Queensland long but have noticed a large black insect in the summer that is very ugly has pincers like an earwig and large chewing jaws. Dont think earwigs are as big as these what are they any ideas

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    I’m not aware of anything similar like you described, Earwigs are on the small side. Can you send a pic via my ‘Ask The Bug Doctor’ page? I should be able to narrow it down that way.

    Thanks

  • Pingback: Flying Termites In The Drywall

  • Roxy

    I have an earwig trapped in a tic-tac container as we speak. I didn’t know what it was, only that it had large pincers and was on my apple comping towards me very quickly. But, since you stated it to be harmless, I shall show mercy to this poor male and set it free instead of freaking out and killing it.
    Thank you for helping me to identify the… thing.

    My home is a bug haven. In every corner of our house — the awnings, the back porch, inside the gas tank lid, inside a storm window, and in other strange, unusual places we have wasps and white-faced hornets trying to nest every year, and the yard was peppered with yellow-jacket nests until I burned them out.
    I’m allergic to bee venom and very frightened of them, so the ordeal of getting rid of the nests every year takes a toll.
    We also have spiders lurking in corners and eating the wasps, lots of nameless creepy… things, and also some non-threatening pleasant things like moths and the mealworm colony I raise for gecko food.

  • Dalialama777

    i live on the second floor in an apartment building and the sprinklers do point straight onto my balcony so thats probably why i keep seeing the pincher bugs all over but they freak me out and i dont want them in my apt. what can  i do to never see one again??

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    Divert the sprinklers for sure– but you could also do what you can with a caulking gun, you’ll be amazed what a difference this can make.

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    Can I come over? Sounds like I could find a few things to do. ;)

  • Malekfawazy

    I see these guys ALL over my yard crawling out from the grass. I still haven’t seen one in my house though, should I be worried?

  • Snowbunny_777

    i keep getting ear wicks in my dog food how do i keep them out of it ?

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    Excellent question Snowbunny,

    It can be as simple as moving the dish but with earwigs it may involve a full scale treatment usually on the outside to keep them from coming inside in the first place. Try the advice in this article first and hopefully it’ll work out fine.
    http://pestcemetery.com/pest-proofing-pets-food/

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    Or Thankful ;)

    You might consider a barrier around the outside of your home since these little guys tend to wander- it’s always easier to prevent the problem then correct it. Also, earwigs can be attracted to light so make sure your front door or windows are well sealed since these areas tend to ‘leak’ light at night and shine a way right on in for the earwig.

    Continued Good Luck on remaining earwig free

  • Nataienickrson

    i have a little boy who has a bite on his EYE  and we think it was an earwig that bite him

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    I’m sorry to hear that- if it indeed it was an earwig I have good news! Earwigs don’t have any venom in their pincers or their mouth parts so besides a little pain and discomfort your boy should be Ok. If you see any undue swelling etc., you should consult a Dr. and explore the other possibilities of what it could be.

    Hope he gets better QUICKLY

  • Keely5

    Hi Bug Doctor, im not sure if most of the comments youve got are from ppl who live in the states but i live in a small town in north england. found your blog very helpful as i had a massive fright yesterday when i looked up and saw one of these bugs crawling almost vertically up the wall across from my bed, and couldnt identify it. my question is: do they move and seek moisture in groups or travel alone? im just wondering if more might be hiding in the corners. thanx x

  • No bugz

    How big can the earwigs get – the ones I’ve seen in Central IL are about 1/2 the size of your thumb and 1/2 inch wide.  They were laying on their backs moving their legs

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    My Dad lives in Dixon and says they get pretty big there too. Length wise I’d say you about got it but width is really only 1/4 inch (maybe) I’ve seen the pics on the web of great big ones but I’m a bit suspect.

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    Great question-

    Although you can find many earwigs in the same location it isn’t because they run in herds or swarms etc. They just all need the same thing and hang out where they can get it. I often find solitary earwigs however just doing what earwigs do. As far as travel, the same rule applies. If one earwig finds his way into your house it wouldn’t be at all strange to find another but not because they are doing it together. It’s just what is conducive, enticing or easy entry for one, will be for others as well.

    Ps.. I get a lot of comment for earwigs from your country- there must be a lot of earwigs there.

  • Tallinnmark

    Maybe I missed it…there are so many posts…but the question nobody is asking is… do they go into your ears?  It is warm and moist in there, and they don’t call them earwigs for nothing.  My vivid imagination comes up with something like …they back into your ear and clamp down to the inside of your ear to hold on with those pincers so then you can’t get them out.  If they are beneficial them I will keep them around, but I don’t want them in my ears…if that is where they like to go!

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    They have been proven to end up there but so have roaches and other insects. It’s just happenstance and not that they seek out anyones ear. I think you’re safe. Did you see the article that I wrote about this very subject? here’s the link http://pestcemetery.com/legend-earwig/