We the jury find the Squirrel killer….?

In New Jersey a pest control company owner is charged with animal cruelty for the death of a squirrel. The company Critter Ridder owned by Kathleen Buck, was hired for the express purpose of eradicating this rodent because it was becoming a nuisance.

Apparently they used a ‘Hav-a-hart’ trap which catches the target pest alive and no one checked the trap for some time. The squirrel was caught in the trap and died on the roof from heat. The trap was set on Wednesday and the squirrel was found dead on Thursday according to Buddy Amato, Chief Humane Law Enforcement Officer.

Ms. Buck faces four counts of animal cruelty, including one that cites her for not providing the squirrel with adequate food, water and shelter.

Kathleen Buck says it was a misunderstanding, she says that usually when an animal is trapped, the customer calls them back. Oh well, unluckily for this squirrel, nobody called or checked. I guess they had more important things to worry about than to check and see if a squirrel had been caught in a trap on the roof.

Is this a misunderstanding? Should Ms. Buck be charged and punished for this alleged crime? Or are the people who are bringing the charges over reacting to a person with a license to perform pest eradication and who were hired for this specific Squirrel problem?

If you were on the jury and this was all the information you had what would you decide? Vote below and then enter your reason in the comments section below.

About The Bug Doctor

Jerry Schappert is a certified pest control operator and Associate Certified Entomologist with over two and a half decades of experience from birds to termites and everything in between. He started as a route technician and worked his way up to commercial/national accounts representative. Always learning in his craft he is familiar with rural pest services and big city control techniques. Jerry has owned and operated a successful pest control company since 1993 in Ocala,Florida. While his knowledge and practical application has benefitted his community Jerry wanted to impart his wisdom on a broader scale to help many more. Pestcemetery.com was born from that idea in 2007 and has been well received. It is the goal of this site to inform you with his keen insights and safely guide you through your pest control treatment needs.
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  • Todd

    NJ law states that traps must be inspected once every 24 hours. I assume this means by the PCO.?

  • admin

    I came across that information after I posted and you are right. But from what I can gather they were REAL close to the 24 hour window anyway. I wonder why no one called the company first but instead called animal control. I knew I didn’t have 100% of the story so I just asked for the vote on what was said so far. I’m sure more will come out as the story develops. I can bet you Mr. Amato wouldn’t be real upset if the squirrel chewd a wire and caused the bldg. to burn down and by the same token I’m sure Ms. Buck will stop relying on others for checking her traps.

    Thanks for reading

  • When outdoors, mice generally feed on grains but will eat anything they can find once they enter your home. If they have nested inside your walls and have easy access to your kitchen or your pantry, they will nibble anything they can get their teeth on. If food is not readily available to them, they will have no reason to stay. Protecting all possible food sources from mice is a good way to keep mice from eating everything in your cupboard, and a good way to make sure they can’t thrive. The food in your pantry that is lightly packaged should go into air-tight containers, and all pet food should be protected in large plastic bins. Keeping a clean home can also help keep mice away. If there are no crumbs to nibble on, mice will have nothing to eat and therefore will not be able to live in your home. If all these prevention techniques have been followed and you still have a mouse problem in your home, it is time to contact a pest control professional. Pest control professionals have tools to get rid of your mouse problem while at the same time keeping your family and your environment safe.

  • When outdoors, mice generally feed on grains but will eat anything they can find once they enter your home. If they have nested inside your walls and have easy access to your kitchen or your pantry, they will nibble anything they can get their teeth on. If food is not readily available to them, they will have no reason to stay. Protecting all possible food sources from mice is a good way to keep mice from eating everything in your cupboard, and a good way to make sure they can’t thrive. The food in your pantry that is lightly packaged should go into air-tight containers, and all pet food should be protected in large plastic bins. Keeping a clean home can also help keep mice away. If there are no crumbs to nibble on, mice will have nothing to eat and therefore will not be able to live in your home. If all these prevention techniques have been followed and you still have a mouse problem in your home, it is time to contact a pest control professional. Pest control professionals have tools to get rid of your mouse problem while at the same time keeping your family and your environment safe.