German Roaches

roach4 150x150 German RoachesGerman Roaches are among mans most filthy and disgusting pest he has to deal with. It’s no wonder that in Germany they call them ‘Prussian Roaches’. I wouldn’t want them named after me either.

Getting rid of roaches is not an easy task. They’ve been around for 350 million years, are incredibly resilient, and the german roach if left alone can pair up and have as many as 60,000 offspring in 1 year. A roach can live up to a month without food but without water will die in 4 or 5 days. They prefer darkened areas and feel most comfortable in small cracks or crevices as thin as a dime. Their antennae are very keen at detecting differences in air pressure and pesticides. It’s your ‘air pressure’ created when entering a room that sends a roach scurrying rather than flipping on the light switch. And it’s the tiny micro dots of pesticide they detect on your counter-top from your recent spraying they avoid that makes killing them so difficult. German roach control is perhaps the most difficult even for the professional exterminator.

Control is aided greatly with sanitation. A truly professional ‘bugman’ will swallow his fear of hurting your feelings and ‘diplomatically’ tell you to ‘clean up your act.’ So I will do the same here. German roaches are so adept at living on the smallest crumbs or drops of water found under your sink or over flowing trash cans. If your home is less than tidy and you have the dreaded german roach, you have to clean up and keep it clean until the pest is eliminated at least.

OK, clean up is over now it’s time to treat. Start with a bright flashlight and some knee pads if you got em. Open drawers–no scratch009 150x150 German Roaches that. Remove the drawers in the kitchen and get your head up in there. It’s a whole other world filled with ledges, bridges, voids, cracks and crevices. It’s much like a hidden condominium complex under the area you cook and clean on everyday. You may not see the actual roaches but tell-tale signs are their fecal matter that dots up the surface usually near their nest or resting spots. You may also see their antenna waving out over the edge of the crack or void they’re in. They see you now too! Next check your appliances much the same way. Pull the refrigerator out look in the motor areas, look at the electrical sockets, the microwave clock window, behind pictures or decorative wall hangings. Back splashes along the counter tops and the ever popular butcher block knife holder are just a few places that are common for these roaches.

Ok now how to treat. Sprays and baits used together can be quite effective but sprays applied on top of or over bait placements is a waste of time and money and NO control is the usual result. Why, because you’ve just contaminated your bait and the roaches will avoid both at this point. First apply your sprays. There are many on the market but if you can find one that has ‘Gentrol’ in it or buy it separately and add it in that is best. Gentrol is an IGR which is a growth regulator or ‘birth control’. This will prevent the roaches affected from reproducing. Choose areas such as baseboard cracks, hard to reach areas under the cabinets to spray or areas where visible bait would not be advisable. Check the label for areas approved for the product you’ve chosen. At this point you might want to reach for the aerosol which is ok to kill the runners. Just be careful to aim careful and not hit the bait placement spots you’ve picked out.

 013 150x150 German RoachesBaits now are applied to areas such as cabinet hinges, ( a favorite spot for roaches ) areas under the sink and drawers you didn’t spray, on the edges of any electrical sockets that showed signs, the back of the fridge, the sides of the pulled out drawers, the guide rail they move on, microwave backing and frame work and the bottoms or framework of other appliances. The label of the baits you choose will also help determine areas of use, also there are many types of baits in many different formulations.( dry flowable, pre-packaged, gel syringe and liquids. Take time to read and compare and it wouldn’t hurt to have one or two different kinds. Results will vary so be prepared to retreat in a couple weeks all the while maintaining good sanitation.
 Happy Hunting!

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About The Bug Doctor

Jerry Schappert is a certified pest control operator and Associate Certified Entomologist with over two and a half decades of experience from birds to termites and everything in between. He started as a route technician and worked his way up to commercial/national accounts representative. Always learning in his craft he is familiar with rural pest services and big city control techniques. Jerry has owned and operated a successful pest control company since 1993 in Ocala,Florida. While his knowledge and practical application has benefitted his community Jerry wanted to impart his wisdom on a broader scale to help many more. Pestcemetery.com was born from that idea in 2007 and has been well received. It is the goal of this site to inform you with his keen insights and safely guide you through your pest control treatment needs.
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  • Catherine

    I was just reading your postings and found it very informative. I have a question though, if you have moved into a building that is highly infested with roaches and they get into your furniture would it help when you move out to place your stuff in storage and bomb/fog and treat it then or before hand? Please could you let me know. The four sets of tenants in the building which I am about to leave have been battling the roach problem for years with no success whatsoever. I am really worried, I am pregnant and my husband is currently in Iraq serving a tour of duty so I am trying to get everything in order before the baby gets here. Tried all the three steps you have stated and still nothing seems to even be putting a dent on the roach populace. Is there anything else you can suggest or perhaps educate me with in dealing with my furniture to get rid of any that may still be lurking before I move to a new home and destroy it with a colony brought over from this nasty place? Would be very grateful, thank you.

  • Catherine

    I was just reading your postings and found it very informative. I have a question though, if you have moved into a building that is highly infested with roaches and they get into your furniture would it help when you move out to place your stuff in storage and bomb/fog and treat it then or before hand? Please could you let me know. The four sets of tenants in the building which I am about to leave have been battling the roach problem for years with no success whatsoever. I am really worried, I am pregnant and my husband is currently in Iraq serving a tour of duty so I am trying to get everything in order before the baby gets here. Tried all the three steps you have stated and still nothing seems to even be putting a dent on the roach populace. Is there anything else you can suggest or perhaps educate me with in dealing with my furniture to get rid of any that may still be lurking before I move to a new home and destroy it with a colony brought over from this nasty place? Would be very grateful, thank you.

  • admin

    Catherine,
    I can hear the frustration you have and believe me I know it well. German Roaches are sometimes so difficult to get rid of.

    I wouldn’t suggest fogging because the roach will simply slip behind a pillow or back into the furniture where the fog won’t reach. I would suggest treating the furniture with bait however. I realize your neighbors have not had success but that is common. There are a lot of sub par baits that don’t really work. Advion roach gel is one of the best you can get. It’s a gel that comes in a syringe and you can put it in so many of the insects hiding spots. My guess is that you shouldn’t be moving furniture so if you can get someone to help you turn over the couch etc. that may help to get it deep in to where it should go. If you are friendly with the neighbors perhaps they too, can do this at the same time. The gel not only works for those who eat it directly but also the ones that don’t because they eat each other and fecal matter etc…yeccch! The only other trick might be some sticky traps that you can place under your furnishings.That is not a lot of help for control but it is cheap and it may clue you in to where the most of them are hiding.

    German roaches take time to completely exterminate. You may well be on the right path but results aren’t showing. Also as you said the neighbors have them and that will always ‘funnel’ some your way. http://pestcemetery.com/recycled-roaches-roaches-apartments/

    If all else fails don’t wait till it gets out of hand and call in a pro. They can set up the staunchest barrier between you and the other tenants. If you let me know where you are I may be able to suggest one.

    God Bless you and your husband for your sacrifice for our country and please let us know if we can help any further.

    The Bug Doctor

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  • MEagain15243

    I was wondering the same thing as well.

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    It can be very difficult to get rid of roaches in a connected living arrangement- caulking plumbing voids and common wall gaps and cracks will go a long way but it really comes down to time, commitment and effort. http://pestcemetery.com/3-easy-ways-rid-german-roaches/
    Fogging hardly ever works for roaches and in the storage room situation described, they’d just hide in some of the articles until the fog dissipated and they’d be no worse for the wear.

  • Bobby

    roaches are a real nightmare i have to laugh an old pest controller said to me many years ago, that if your spraying for roaches and you can see where your spraying, THEN YOUR SPRAYING IN THE WRONG AREA…. lol

  • http://pestcemetery.com The Bug Doctor

    Ha ;) I like that line!